Clinical Philosophy

Clinical Philosophy

Treatment begins with a clear clinical picture.  Clinicians utilize a psychology model, which involves facilitating client self-disclosure, acquiring collateral information, and administrating formalized assessment techniques.  Clinical formulation is a dynamic process and must adjust to the acquisition of new information, including changes within the client and the client’s environment.

Change is a process–not an event. Clients determine the pace of change, recognizing that many forms of change require support and accountability both to oneself, as well as to external entities.  Treatment services and outcomes guide the change process for individuals who are willing to engage in the process. Maintaining change is a proactive process that may incorporate traditional counseling as well as modification of the client’s environment, community, and life circumstances.

Clients may struggle to recognize resources within themselves and within their community to address their needs and thus, are seeking assistance in this process.  An important component of intervention is the identification of both strengths and needs within an individual, their environment, and their cultural context, which contribute to both positive and negative outcomes.  Intervention is based on a sound theoretical basis and/or on empirically informed evidence and results in measureable outcomes.

All clinical practices must utilize sound ethical principles. All clinical decisions should be filtered through the primary ethical constructs of cultural competence, non-malfeasance, beneficence, and autonomy/least restrictive environment.